PROGRESSIVELY RESTRUCTURING FOOTPRINTS IN THE COLD

Amongst the greater scheme of what is happening in this world of ours, there are a few of things that I feel keenly today.

I have received notification – perhaps a number of other bloggers have too – that a friend, who is no longer with us, has her birthday in six days. Whether it was a real birthday or a blog birthday is of no matter, it is the notification that matters. I often think of Isadora.

Next, a selfish concern: today I have been cold. I put thicker outdoor wear on this afternoon as the temperature dropped lower than it was in the morning. I think there was an attempt at snow, but it was just too cold. The wind chill made it feel even colder. I may turn up the heating.

I heard a mature man’s heart rend today, the sound of loss and grief, because of the Government announcements which will affect the community in which he has made his home.

The chill wind of harsh politics will be keenly felt by the vast majority of the UK population.

The Moray coastal towns in Scotland have been hard hit with the defence cuts that were announced today. A report highlighted that this area was the most militarily dependent one in the UK. 1:6 people (and attendant businesses) are going to be severely affected by the announcement. I am still trying to work out what the fancy terminology of ‘reforming and/or restructuring the defence footprint’ is supposed to mean. It sounds like another political attempt at re-framing the English Language with home made definitions concocted to suit.

That other overused political use of vocabulary… the positive word ‘progressive’: I don’t know about you, but I am switching off, it has become progressively jaded. The positively progressive spin that is being placed on every action initiated by the government is anything but progressive.

The chill wind of harsh politics will be keenly felt by the vast majority of the UK population.

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0 thoughts on “PROGRESSIVELY RESTRUCTURING FOOTPRINTS IN THE COLD

  1. Yes, the economic recession, or depressionĀ… whateve it isĀ… is not over yet. And spreading a certain gloom in Europe and America. I watch the news from ParisĀ… and wonder where it’ll go.

  2. I felt for those people in Scotland last night when there was talk of cloing of bases, and also the rest of those people likely to lose their jobs. I suspect rates of depression and suicide will rise never mind the long term effect on those who will take years to find work, if ever.

  3. We all wonder where the unrest will go Shimon. The cuts in the UK are heavier than those in France and, certainly on the social security, pensions and welfare fronts, our systems have not been as generous as in similar societies elsewhere.

    The French are protesting about a pension age of 62. Our men, all my life, have retired at 65. Women used to retire at 60, they have already started a longer working life, now retiring at 63. By 2020, there will be parity of retirement ages for men and women, both at the age of 66 years.

    Other cuts announced in our budget today, will cause major pockets of poverty from which we will see a disturbed society and unrest. At the moment any protests in the UK are relatively calm and very few in number.

  4. Sadly, I think you are right LLC. There have already been lost generations from the two recessions during previous Conservative Governments. They are in living memory, and whatever the reasons underlying those recessions, the affects on the ordinary working person were the same.

    A small meeting, a very small one, took place in Morayshire today, with a few people who still have the motivation to consider what they might be able to do as a community.

    The reality of what is in store is incomprehensible to all of us.

  5. I think it will be some time before we can really comprehend it. It is such a big upheavaland there are a lot of hidden cuts that many are not aware of. I know that many at the lower end of the financial scale will suffer. There is no room in their tight budgets for a 10% cut.

  6. You’re quite right LLC. I’ve been discussing the repeated announcement that the top 2% of what….earners, (unearned income earners?) will be hit hard.

    First, we don’t know what the definition of the top 2%… of ?????, is. Without that vital piece of information, we cannot assess the statement. It comes across as a gratuitous cry.

    Whatever is taken from the 2% mentioned, it will not impact severely on them, not as greatly as 10% or even 5% will, from low income groups, who are much the largest group. They will be joined and enlarged by the ever growing numbers of unemployed people.

  7. I guess that the the birthday reminder thing will continue to flag up whilst the blog remains open (which it will for a while, as we (the family) are not prepared to lose it yet. I hope it didn’t disturb you too much.
    On your other topics, I agree there is nothing progressive about the current government’s actions.
    I fear that there is a lot of pain still to come from the political and economic situation that the country is in.

  8. Isadora’s blog birthday announcement reminded me that I missed her, however, it was not a bother. She is a great personality to remember. Isadora and I had some common hunting grounds in London, and at about the same period, that I could relate to when she wrote of her experiences there. It made for an extra special link. I’m glad the blog remains open.

    There is much government retrograde action; it’s a huge political experiment. Let’s hope it has some light at the end of the painful tunnel. Blast the global bankers!

    Where I live, there has been an almost bankrupt authority for the last three years. It can manage to spend money near to the honey pot when it chooses. Some major local outcries have modified some of its behaviour. However, we have experienced cut backs in our communities during a period when others were more comfortable. Further paring, I am deeply concerned about.

    Good to hear from you Marika. x

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